This is my puppy, Barney.

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We got him on the Ides of March, which of course we all know you’re supposed to beware, but there is nothing to beware about this dog.  Unless you’re eating a pancake.  This puppy goes bonkers for pancakes.  We discovered this on his first day at home.  My toddler threw a pancake on the floor, and Barney ate it like it was covered in powdered sugar and crack dust.  Ever since then I’ve been making him pancakes.  He will do anything for a pancake.

The first thing you’ll need to do is make yourself some pancakes.  You’re the pack leader, right?  If you have a griddle, turn it on to about 375F.

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While it’s heating up, mix up your batter.  I use the Everday Pancakes recipe I got from the New York Times:

2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar, which they say is optional but let’s get real
2 eggs
1½ to 2 cups milk

You mix up your dry stuff and your wet stuff separately, and then you mix them all together.  Gently, or you’ll have chewy cakes, and nobody wants that.  This recipe makes about eight cakes.  You make seven pancakes for the people.  Then when those are all done, you stir some more milk into your leftover batter.  I use a third- to a half-cup, depending on how much batter is left.  You want it to be pretty thin.  Then you make little puppy pancakes out of your thinned batter.

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When they’re done on one side, you flip them and then turn the griddle off.  Then you leave them out all day, and overnight.  You want them to get dried out and crunchy.  They’ll look like this.

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I put them in a Ziploc and break them into a whole bunch of little pieces.  They should keep for a couple of weeks.  That’s plenty of time to teach your dog to do all kinds of worthless tricks.  Barney will touch my hand with his nose if I tell him to.  Isn’t that cute?  Behold, the power of pancakes.

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